How motivation theories can be applied

Affective factors in L2 learningUncategorized In a couple of previous posts I briefly touched on theories of motivation and on how they can be tapped into to raise student achievement.

How motivation theories can be applied

These needs are arranged in a hierarchy. Maslow suggests that we seek first to satisfy the lowest level of needs. Once this is done, we seek to satisfy each higher level of need until we have satisfied all five needs.

The Hierarchy of Needs is as follows: Physiological Needs basic issues of survival such as salary and stable employment 2. Security Needs stable physical and emotional environment issues such as benefits, pension, safe work environment, and fair work practices 3.

Taylor's Theory of Scientifc Management

Esteem Needs positive self-image and respect and recognition issues such as job titles, nice work spaces, and prestigious job assignments. Generally, a person beginning their career will be very concerned with physiological needs such as adequate wages and stable income and security needs such as benefits and a safe work environment.

We all want a good salary to meet the needs of our family and we want to work in a stable environment. Employees whose lowest level needs have not been met will make job decisions based on compensation, safety, or stability concerns.

Also, employees will revert to satisfying their lowest level needs when these needs are no longer met or are threatened such as during an economic downturn. The first priority of workers is their survival. Click To Tweet This places an extra obligation on managers to act humanely when difficult organizational decisions such as staff reductions have to be implemented.

Callous implementation of difficult decisions will cause the remaining employees in the organization to feel threatened about the ability or desire of the organization to continue to meet their physiological and security needs.

Once these basic needs are met, the employee will want his "belongingness" or social needs met. The level of social interaction an employee desires will vary based on whether the employee is an introvert or extrovert. The key point is that employees desire to work in an environment where they are accepted in the organization and have some interaction with others.

This means effective interpersonal relations are necessary.

Using Motivation Theories to Improve Team Morale

Managers can create an environment where staff cooperation is rewarded. This will encourage interpersonal effectiveness. This last point is especially important for virtual employees whose absence from the office puts an extra obligation on managers to keep these employees engaged in organizational communications.

Click To Tweet Higher Level Needs With these needs satisfied, an employee will want his higher level needs of esteem and self-actualization met. Even if an individual does not want to move into management, he probably does not want to do the same exact work for 20 years.

He may want to be on a project team, complete a special task, learn other tasks or duties, or expand his duties in some manner.

Cross-training, job enrichment, and special assignments are popular methods for making work more rewarding.

What is Motivation?

Finally, symbols of accomplishment such as a meaningful job title, job perks, awards, a nice office, business cards, work space, etc. The important consideration for managers is that they must provide rewards to their employees that both come from the organization and from doing the work itself.

Rewards need to be balanced to have a maximum effect. For work rewards to be meaningful, they must come both from the organization and from the work itself. Click To Tweet Finally, while work assignments and rewards are important considerations to meeting employee esteem needs, workplace fairness equity is also important.

With self-actualization, the employee will be interested in growth and individual development. He will also need to be skilled at what he does. He may want a challenging job, an opportunity to complete further education, increased freedom from supervision, or autonomy to define his own processes for meeting organizational objectives.

This theory of motivation can be applied to the workplace as well as other scenarios. Maslow felt that the most basic needs were physiological. Unless an individual has food and shelter, Maslow believed it was pointless trying to motivate them at a higher level. Jul 27,  · In a couple of previous posts I briefly touched on theories of motivation and on how they can be tapped into to raise student achievement. Four theories may be placed under this category: Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, ERG theory, Herzberg’s two-factor theory, and McClelland’s acquired-needs theory. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Abraham Maslow is among the most prominent psychologists of the twentieth century.

At this highest level, managers focus on promoting an environment where an employee can meet his own self-actualization needs. As one need is met, we desire other needs.

Will the raise we received 3 years ago motivate us for the next 10 years? Will the challenging job we began 5 years ago have the same effect on us today?

Will the performance award we received last year completely satisfy our need for recognition for the rest of our lives? The answers to all of these questions is clearly, no. Maslow understood these truths and this is the beauty of his theory of motivation.Managers usually strive to find ways to motivate their staff.

Behavioral psychologists have developed various theories about motivation in an attempt to better understand and control human behavior. A basic understanding of three major motivation theories helps us to . Four theories may be placed under this category: Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, ERG theory, Herzberg’s two-factor theory, and McClelland’s acquired-needs theory.

How motivation theories can be applied

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Abraham Maslow is among the most prominent psychologists of the twentieth century. While modern research shows some shortcomings with this theory (for example, a lack of empirical evidence for some conclusions), Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Theory remains an important and simple motivation tool for managers to understand and apply.

Instinct theory, drive theory, and humanistic theory are some of the examples of motivation theories Motivational studies are very important especially for managers in big companies.

These studies deliver insights into the way employees perform at work and this gives the employer or the manager the techniques required to increase worker. Motivation theories have been applied to explain this interesting and important question.

How motivation theories can be applied

One theory that has been particularly successful in explaining ethical behavior is reinforcement theory. Just like any other behavior such as performance or cooperation, ethical behavior is one that is learned as a result of the consequences following one’s .

This theory of motivation can be applied to the workplace as well as other scenarios. Maslow felt that the most basic needs were physiological.

Unless an individual has food and shelter, Maslow believed it was pointless trying to motivate them at a higher level.

Three Major Theories of Motivation | Your Business